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BRIDGE BRIEFING: Ryan And K-12 Education

The Ryan Plan Would Reduce Education Funding By Over $115 Billion Over 10 Years, Undermining Critical Education Programs

Office Of Management And Budget: The Ryan Plan Would Cut Critical Education Programs By Reducing Department Of Education Funding By More Than $115 Billion Over 10 Years. According to a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee press release, “Ryan’s Plan Cuts Critical Education Programs. ‘The Department of Education would be cut by more than $115 billion over a decade. 9.6 million students would see their Pell Grants fall by more than $1000 in 2014, and, over the next decade, over one million students would lose support altogether. This would derail bipartisan education reforms and deeply undermine K-12 education and college opportunity […] Roughly two million slots in Head Start would be eliminated over the next decade — cutting 200,000 children from the program in 2014 alone.’ [OMB, 3/21/12]” [Targeted News Service, 3/25/12]

The Oregonian: The Ryan Plan Would Cut Investments In Education And Training By 53 Percent. “According to the Center for American Progress, the Ryan plan would ‘disinvest’ in education and training by 53 percent, diverting resources away from primary and adult education, career and technical training, community colleges, postsecondary education and student aid, at a time when our world educational status is already in perilous decline.” [The Oregonian, 5/2/11]

Ryan Plan Would Cut Education Funding For Disadvantaged Children By $2.7 Billion

Under Ryan’s Plan, Title I Program, Which Covers Cost Of Educating Disadvantaged Kids Would Face $2.7 Billion Cut And Job Loss For 38,000 Teachers’ Aides. According to Education Week, “To put the cuts in perspective, Duncan said the $14.5 billion Title I program, which helps districts cover the cost of educating disadvantaged kids, could see a $2.7 billion cut. As many as 38,000 teachers’ aides could lose their jobs, he said.” [Education Week, 3/22/12]

Under Ryan’s Plan, Funding For Children With Disabilities Could Be Cut By More Than $2.2 Billion And Result In The Loss Of 30,000 Special Education Teachers. According to Education Week, “…funding for children with disabilities could be cut by over $2.2 billion, meaning that 30,000 special education teachers, teachers’ aides, and others could be cut. Special education state grants are funded at $11.6 billion this year.” [Education Week, 3/22/12]

Ryan Plan Would Eliminate Head Start Slots For More Than 2 Million Children

Over 10 Years, More Than 2 Million Children Would Lose Opportunity To Attend Head Start Programs Under Ryan’s Budget Plan. According to the Huffington Post, “Over the next decade, the NEA estimates, more than two million children would lose opportunities to attend Head Start centers as a result of the cuts. As it stands, only 30 percent of eligible children participate in the program, but children’s advocates tend to argue that the program should be expanded, not diminished. The proposal ‘translates directly into lost opportunities and outcomes for our students,’ Roberto Rodriguez, President Barack Obama’s education policy advisor, said on a Thursday call with reporters. ‘It really has the potential of turning us backwards.’” [Huffington Post, 3/29/12]

In 2014 Alone, Ryan’s Budget Plan Would Eliminate Slots In Head Start For Nearly 200,000 Children. According to the Huffington Post, “the House is preparing to pass a Republican budget that would slash funding for Head Start, a federally funded program that provides a wide range of services to a million young children living in poverty and their families.’ The plan, proposed by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), who chairs the House Budget Committee, would eliminate slots for about 200,000 children in 2014, according to an analysis by the National Education Association.” [Huffington Post, 3/29/12]

The Ryan Plan Would Cause 77% Of School Districts To Lose More Than 10% Of Their Annual Funding

New America Foundation: Under The Ryan Plan, 77 Percent Of School Districts That Relied On Federal Funds Would Lose More Than 10 Percent Of Their Annual Revenue. According to New America Foundation, “Paul Ryan’s proposal to cut federal spending by 20 percent has been impossible to ignore – especially what that might mean for education programs. Federal spending currently makes up about 10 percent of annual spending for education, so a 20 percent cut to that spending would only translate to 2 percent of total spending, on average. But what about the impact on non-average school districts?  As it turns out, more than 1,500 districts rely on federal funds for 20 percent or more of their annual revenue, and those districts would take a big hit…Of the more than 1,500 districts that rely on federal funds for 20 percent or more of their annual revenue, seventy-seven would lose more than 10 percent of their annual revenue if Congress were to cut federal spending by 20 percent. Those districts tend to be smaller, with enrollments mostly between 100 and 2,000.” [New America Foundation, 9/5/12]

Ryan Voted Against Funding Additional Teachers

Paul Ryan Voted against Education Funding to Help Avoid Teacher Layoffs. Paul Ryan voted against the conference report of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included $53.6 billion for a state fiscal stabilization fund of which, $39.5 billion would be used to enhance local school budgets. Governors were to channel money to avoid teacher layoffs and modernization of school buildings. Also included $1 billion for Head Start programs. The measure also included $15.84 billion for student financial assistance and to carry out the Higher Education Act of 1965. [Roll Call 46, H 1, 01/28/2009; CQ Bill Analysis HR1; New York Times, 2/14/09]

1999: Paul Ryan Voted To Eliminate Funding For New Teachers. Paul Ryan voted in favor of a Republican budget resolution that cut all funding for the 100,000 new teachers program. This included eliminating the funding for the 30,000 teachers that were hired in 1998, the 8,000 new teachers that would be hired in 1999 and any future teachers. The budget passed 221-208. [Roll Call 77, S 68, 03/25/1999]

Ryan Supported No Child Left behind, But Then Refused To Fund It

Ryan Voted to Cut No Child Left Behind by $784 Million. In 2005, Ryan voted in favor of the Labor, HHS & Education appropriations conference report that cut $1.5 billion from key domestic priorities. The measure cut education programs by $59 million – including a $784 million cut from No Child Left Behind programs. The bill provided less than a one percent increase in Title I reading and math assistance for low-income children – the smallest increase in 8 years. In addition, the bill cut $87 million from programs that helped nearly 14,000 school districts that relied on the funding for school safety, drug prevention and anti-violence activities. The bill failed 209-224 [Roll Call 598, H 3010, 11/17/2005; House Appropriations Committee Democratic Staff, “Summary of the Conference Agreement – HR 3010,” 11/16/05]

Ryan Supported Bill that Underfunded NCLB by $8 Billion. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of the appropriations bill for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education. The bill underfunded the landmark No Child Left Behind Act by $8 billion and provided the smallest percentage increase in education funding in eight years. Because of the bill, 54,000 fewer teachers would receive federally supported professional development. Special education programs would receive a $1 billion funding increase, compared to the $2.2 billion increase promised by Republicans. Pell Grants would finance only 38 percent of the cost of a public university, compared to 84 percent when the Pell Grant program was established. The bill passed 215-208 [Roll Call 353, H 2660, 07/10/2003]

Ryan Supported Budget Cutting NCLB by $1 Billion. In 2003, Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten years, below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212 [Roll Call 82, S 95, 03/21/2003]

Paul Ryan Supported Budget Cutting NCLB by $1 Billion. In 2003, Paul Ryan voted in favor of a budget resolution that provided for $1.3 trillion in tax cuts over ten years, while cutting programs for children and public education by $38 billion over ten years, below the amount needed to maintain current service levels. It provided virtually no increase for education programs overall and cut funding for No Child Left Behind programs by $1 billion (from $23.8 billion to $22.8 billion). In addition, the House Budget eliminated 46 education programs (such as Rural Education, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology), cut the after school program by 40 percent (or $400 million), and reduced the maximum Pell Grant award (from $4,050 to $4,000). The budget passed 215-212. [Roll Call 82, S 95, 03/21/2003]

Ryan Supported No Child Left Behind Bill. In 2001, Ryan voted in favor of President Bush’s No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) to overhaul education proposals to increase school accountability and reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for six years. The final version of the bill required states to annually test students in reading and math in grades three through eight, provide new accountability measures for schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress, and give schools greater flexibility to spend federal funds. It included about $26.3 billion for federal elementary and secondary education programs and $13.5 billion for Title I programs for disadvantaged children in fiscal 2002.The bill passed 381-41. [Roll Call 497, H 1, 12/13/2001]