BREAKING AUDIO: Perdue’s Closing Argument

Asked today about whether his company was closing down American plants as they opened others overseas, Perdue quickly responded, “Sure, we closed down plants all the time…”

Listen to the breaking audio above.

It’s an interesting closing argument — no pun intended — to cap off what’s been a disastrous last month for David Perdue’s campaign, as a series of events shed light on both his business career and his worldview. His downward spiral began when an old deposition surfaced, revealing that Perdue himself had admitted, “I spent most of my career” outsourcing.  Asked the next day how he would defend that record, Perdue looked shocked — “Well defend it? I’m proud of it!” he replied.

Read more after the jump.

The Greedy Outsourcing Party

It’s no secret that Mitt Romney’s checkered business career was part of what doomed his election hopes in 2012. When people looked at Mitt Romney, they saw a vulture capitalist who was willing to close down American plants, lay off workers, and ship jobs overseas, so long as it helped their bottom dollar.

Having run for president, Romney’s business practices are likely the most infamous among Republican politicians, but he’s hardly alone. This year, key GOP candidates in close senate and gubernatorial races espouse the same self-interested philosophy — reaping profits while hurting American workers.

In Georgia, David Perdue’s campaign was rocked as POLITICO reported that Perdue had stated plainly in a 2005 deposition that he had “spent most of his career” outsourcing. This statement itself would have been severely damaging to Perdue’s candidacy, but what was even more detrimental, perhaps because it was so revealing, was Perdue’s dumbfounded response to the story. Asked how he would defend his outsourcing career, Perdue looked surprised — “Well defend it? I’m proud of it!”

In Illinois, billionaire gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner, who took a page out of Romney’s playbook and funneled millions in profits to Cayman Island tax shelters to avoid paying American taxes, has demonstrated similar priorities. Rauner’s vast portfolio while at GTCR, the private equity firm he co-founded, included directing H-Cube, a “premier global business outsourcing firm.” And just this month, we learned that a lawsuit has been launched by the former CEO of LeapSource, another outsourcing company where Rauner sat on the board, alleging personal threats from Rauner over her lack of success as their CEO.

Read more after the jump.

Happy Birthday!

Seventy-nine years ago today President Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law, marking a new page in our nation’s history that attempted to rid the widespread problem of Americans spending their golden years trapped in poverty.

Fast forward forty five years later. David Koch runs for Vice President on a Libertarian ticket that calls Social Security – already at that time a wildly successful program that has helped millions – “the most serious threat to the future stability of our society next to the threat of nuclear war.”

Today? The Republican Party, fully embracing a hard right, extreme Tea Party, Koch-fueled agenda, runs a docket of Senate candidates who would make cuts to or have otherwise attacked Social Security. While Americans old and young continue to cherish the promise of retiring with some stability, Republican Senate candidates have made their priorities clear — and protecting their Koch cash-flow comes long before protecting your retirement.

These GOPers are coming at it from every angle. Some, like Tom Cotton and Cory Gardner, have voted to raise the eligibility age from 65 to 70, because what’s five more years of work when you’re sitting pretty in your taxpayer-funded job? Some candidates, like David Perdue, Mike McFadden and Monica Wehby, have offered nebulous support for cuts, because plans and details are hard (and voters clearly might not like to hear what they really think). Terri Lynn Land and Joni Ernst haven’t spent time in Congress yet, but they sure are keen on privatizing the program. Mainstream? Not hardly.

Supporting research after the jump.

Georgia, Meet Mitt Romney Lite

When Mitt Romney got pummeled in the 2012 election, the GOP was forced to reboot and consider how to attract candidates who can be more competitive. In Georgia, the GOP’s conclusion was to run an elitist millionaire with a checkered business record and an inability to understand the concerns of working families. Sound familiar?

But don’t worry, David Perdue isn’t a total clone of Mitt Romney. While Romney was serving as Governor of Massachusetts, for instance, David Perdue was busy tanking a company called Pillowtex, leaving its 7,500 workers out to dry and pocketing a cool $3.1 million in the process. It wasn’t the first batch of American jobs that was killed under Perdue’s stewardship.

From 1994 to 1998, Perdue served as a senior vice-president at Haggar. Under his leadership, Haggar implemented an enormous shift of company employment and operations overseas. Thousands of American workers lost their jobs, and nearly 50% of the company’s domestic workforce was laid off, but Perdue brushed it off as being “in the best interest of the company.”

Read more after the jump.

Memo From President Brad Woodhouse: Race to the Right in Georgia

The top two extreme Republicans running for Senate in Georgia have advanced to the next round of this knock down, drag out, race to the right primary fight. With two more months of campaigning until the runoff, David Perdue and Jack Kingston will undoubtedly continue to pander to the Tea Party base. Whether opposing raising the minimum wage/extending unemployment benefits, or supporting cuts to Medicare/attempting to voucherize the program, extreme conservatives Perdue and Kingston have more in common than not. Not to mention the time Kingston suggested low-income children perform manual labor in exchange for subsidized school lunches, and Perdue’s track record as an out-of-touch elitist. Is this the face of a Republican Party that has learned its rebrand lessons from 2012?

Full research after the jump.

Unequal Pay Day

It’s 2014. Paying women the same as men for the same work should be a no-brainer, right? Not for many right-wing Republicans. The extreme conservatives highlighted in American Bridge’s new website UnequalPay.com have gone to absurd lengths to block and even undo equal pay protections for women: voting against the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, paying female employees less than their male counterparts, and arguing that women don’t really want equal pay anyway, so what’s all the fuss about? The list of these shameful tactics and faulty arguments goes on and on.

In honor of this year’s Equal Pay Day, check out American Bridge’s new website and read below for a few highlights of Republican office holders and candidates whose opposition to equal pay protections should give female voters serious pause at the ballot box.

View supporting research after the jump.