In Academia, As In The Senate, Marco Rubio Failed To Meet His Obligations

Marco Rubio’s prolific Senate absenteeism and field-leading missed votes have been the target of repeated criticism over the last months. Why hasn’t he been going to work? He just doesn’t like it. “He hates” working in the Senate, a friend told the Washington Post in October.

We don’t know with certainty that Marco Rubio “hated” his teaching job at Florida International University, but records reveal a similar indifference and neglect of responsibility in the Florida senator’s second career. According to the Tampa Bay Times:

[E]ven in an often overlooked part of Rubio’s professional life — academia — public records show a familiar pattern for the presidential contender: basic expectations for the job unmet or ignored, dubious accountability and oversight, and job opportunities that would be highly unlikely for anyone without his political stature.

“[E]xpected to do considerably more work than he actually performed,” the Times reports that he “never developed reading lists or graded papers or tests, according his colleagues” — two requirements made explicit in his position’s job description.

In academia, as in the Senate, Marco Rubio neglected his duties and failed to meet his obligations. With a starting salary of $69,000 in 2009, Rubio got paid $23,448 last year — on top of the $174,000 he made as a U.S. Senator.

But that wasn’t enough to get Rubio to do his job — either of them.

What we’re all wondering: Has Marco Rubio ever followed through on a promise and done what was expected of him?