Josh Hawley Just Can’t Escape Greitens’s Scandals

“Yet again, Josh Hawley is getting dragged into the legal storm surrounding Governor Eric Greitens’s unethical and immoral behavior. Because Hawley was so focused on campaigning for a political promotion, he whitewashed his investigation into the Greitens Administration’s attempts to hide public business from the people of Missouri — and now his chickens are coming home to roost,” said American Bridge spokesperson Joshua Karp.

 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Hawley’s office subpoenaed for Greitens Confide investigation records

By Jack Suntrup | May 8, 2018

  • “A St. Louis County attorney wants reams of documents from Attorney General Josh Hawley related to one of Hawley’s probes of Gov. Eric Greitens, a fellow Republican.”
  • “Hawley launched an investigation in December of Greitens’ office to see if Greitens or his staffers violated the state’s records retention laws by using Confide, a smartphone app which deletes text messages after they have been read by their recipient.”
  • “Hawley cleared Greitens, saying he found no evidence of wrongdoing. But Democrats heaped criticism on Hawley, who is running for U.S. Senate, for not attempting to interview Greitens or attempting the retrieve text messages sent using the app.”
  • “At the same time, Mark Pedroli, a Clayton lawyer representing Ben Sansone of the Sunshine Project, sued Greitens over his use of Confide. Last week, a Cole County judge ruled against Greitens’ attempt to throw out the lawsuit.”
  • “Pedroli subsequently filed a subpoena asking that the attorney general’s office turn over ‘[a]ll documents, digital files, e-mails, communications, reports, summaries, testimony, written witness statements, recorded witness statements, notes of witness statements, depositions, in the possession of The Missouri Attorney General’s Office’ related to the attorney general’s March 1 report clearing the governor.”
  • “Pedroli also wants information related to the attorney general’s office policy regarding Confide, and how the office formed its opinion of what is deemed a ‘transitory’ record — public records that do not have to be retained because they are considered inconsequential.”

Read the full article here.