New Bridge Project Trumpcare Ad Spotlights Trump Breaking His Promises

In advance of the House Trumpcare vote, Bridge Project is releasing a new digital ad that blasts Donald Trump for violating health care promises he made to the American people on the campaign trail.

This ad, “Was Anything He Said Not a Lie?” contrasts the assurances Donald Trump made to voters – that he would deliver better, cheaper health care for “everybody” – with the consensus among independent experts that Trumpcare would take health insurance away from tens of millions of Americans, as well as make health care costs spike for working and middle class families, seniors, and rural Americans.

The ad also highlights that many assessments show Trumpcare would disproportionately harm his own supporters – and shows Trump acknowledging this.

“Trumpcare betrays millions upon millions of vulnerable Americans that Donald Trump pledged he would help. This plan would kick millions off of their coverage – even more so than if Republicans simply repealed […]

Read more after the jump.

Off The Prompter, Off His Rocker: Trump Goes Old School Unhinged In Georgia

Donald Trump was off the prompter and way off-message today in Atlanta, Georgia. For an hour and ten minutes, Trump meandered aimlessly through his favorite talking points: Polls (which are now “false”), anti-immigrant sentiments, eating hamburgers in lieu of state dinners, tent safety, and railing on Republican leadership.

Noticeably missing from Trump’s blathering was any mention of efforts to prevent those on terrorist watch lists to purchase firearms. In fact, the only mention of guns made by Trump was to suggest that more people should carry them in bars (and a brief aside to make some gun sounds.)

Enjoy the “highlights”!

On his poll numbers going up after Orlando shooting YouTube
Making gun sounds YouTube
The LGBT community has been in favor of what he’s saying YouTube
Belgium is a beautiful city YouTube
On the Orlando shooter: “He was born here but his parents weren’t”  YouTube

“If some of the people in […]

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All of the poison in all of the wells!

In case you haven’t heard, Republicans are adamant that when Obama announces his immigration reform executive action tonight, he will be “poisoning the well.

But how can you poison a well that’s already been poisoned so many times? Why, it seems every time the President takes a position, according to Republicans, he’s “poisoning the well.”

When President Obama tried to pass background checks on gun sales after Newtown — a policy supported by 9 in 10 voters — Lindsey Graham accused him of poisoning the well. And when Obama signed legislation reforming a broken health care system — a goal of Democratic and Republican presidents for decades — John McCain said he had poisoned the well. Jeff Flake said that if Obama took any credit for the immigration reform principles in the bipartisan Senate bill, he would be poisoning the well. According to Marco Rubio, policy to protect DREAMers poisoned the well. To other Republicans it was the president’s refusal to cave to their demands during their government shutdown that poisoned the well, or criticizing Paul Ryan’s draconian budget, or passing a stimulus package, or repealing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.

So what was truly the moment when President Obama poisoned the well? What was the well-poisoning-iest moment of his illustrious well-poisoning career? To Republicans, it appears that perhaps it was just the moment he was elected president — ever since then, the GOP can’t stop finding newly poisoned wells.

Supporting research after the jump.

The New Tea Party Cavalry Riding Into Washington

The Republican Party rode a Koch-fuelled wave to victory in elections around the country this week, but don’t let them fool you: nothing about their extreme, Tea Party agenda has changed. The GOP has not moderated itself. It has not rid itself of “gaffe-prone” candidates. It has not adopted a milder, more palatable stance on key policy issues that impact the lives of women, immigrants, or working families. And the proof is in the pudding. A quick scan of some of the newest members of the House shows just how extreme this latest crop of Tea Party Republican members of Congress truly are.

From Georgia to Maine, Virginia to Wisconsin, Illinois to Iowa, extreme Tea Party Republicans have been elected to seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Take Glenn Grothman in Wisconsin’s 6th District to start. We’ve already detailed the long list of Grothman’s greatest extreme hits, but as a quick refresher, the Congressman-elect has: proselytized about the “war on men,” fought for a seven-day workweek, and proposed a law to formally consider single parenthood a contributing factor to child abuse.

Read more after the jump.

BREAKING AUDIO: Perdue’s Closing Argument

Asked today about whether his company was closing down American plants as they opened others overseas, Perdue quickly responded, “Sure, we closed down plants all the time…”

Listen to the breaking audio above.

It’s an interesting closing argument — no pun intended — to cap off what’s been a disastrous last month for David Perdue’s campaign, as a series of events shed light on both his business career and his worldview. His downward spiral began when an old deposition surfaced, revealing that Perdue himself had admitted, “I spent most of my career” outsourcing.  Asked the next day how he would defend that record, Perdue looked shocked — “Well defend it? I’m proud of it!” he replied.

Read more after the jump.

The Greedy Outsourcing Party

It’s no secret that Mitt Romney’s checkered business career was part of what doomed his election hopes in 2012. When people looked at Mitt Romney, they saw a vulture capitalist who was willing to close down American plants, lay off workers, and ship jobs overseas, so long as it helped their bottom dollar.

Having run for president, Romney’s business practices are likely the most infamous among Republican politicians, but he’s hardly alone. This year, key GOP candidates in close senate and gubernatorial races espouse the same self-interested philosophy — reaping profits while hurting American workers.

In Georgia, David Perdue’s campaign was rocked as POLITICO reported that Perdue had stated plainly in a 2005 deposition that he had “spent most of his career” outsourcing. This statement itself would have been severely damaging to Perdue’s candidacy, but what was even more detrimental, perhaps because it was so revealing, was Perdue’s dumbfounded response to the story. Asked how he would defend his outsourcing career, Perdue looked surprised — “Well defend it? I’m proud of it!”

In Illinois, billionaire gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner, who took a page out of Romney’s playbook and funneled millions in profits to Cayman Island tax shelters to avoid paying American taxes, has demonstrated similar priorities. Rauner’s vast portfolio while at GTCR, the private equity firm he co-founded, included directing H-Cube, a “premier global business outsourcing firm.” And just this month, we learned that a lawsuit has been launched by the former CEO of LeapSource, another outsourcing company where Rauner sat on the board, alleging personal threats from Rauner over her lack of success as their CEO.

Read more after the jump.

Ain’t No Party Like A Shutdown Party: Your 2014 GOP

A year ago today was a dark day for Washington. Like, literally dark — the Republican Party turned off the lights to the federal government, holding the economy hostage to try to score political points. It didn’t work.

In fact, all the government shutdown did was suck $24 billion out of the US economy, while leaving the Republican Party deeply damaged. It’s easy to associate the shutdown with the likes of Ted Cruz, the man who drives the GOP strategy. But it’s not just Ted Cruz who supported the shutdown. It’s nearly every Republican Senate candidate in key races and a slew of 2016 frontrunners.

Their support manifested itself in different ways. Cory Gardner voted for the shutdown, risked default by voting against raising the debt ceiling, voted to prolong the shutdown, and then hobnobbed with Karl Rove and his big-money donor friends while America paid the price for his actions.

View supporting research after the jump.

Crooked Chiefs

The Republican Governors Association says “the future of the GOP rests in the hands of the Republican governors.” Given the Tea Party antics and extreme agenda of Republicans in Congress, that very well may be true. But if it is, Republicans have a serious problem on their hands because nearly half of all current Republican governors nationwide are facing corruption charges or other scandals. Nowhere has this been more apparent than in the political rise and fall of former Virginia Governor

Bob McDonnell, newly convicted on eleven counts of corruption in a scandal with a wealthy donor and benefactor all of his own making.

Investigation cover ups. Illegal gifts. Cronyism. Pay to play schemes. Taxpayer dollars going to campaign purposes. Using their office to exact political revenge on their own constituents. The list of allegations goes on and on and on. From Georgia to Wisconsin to Kansas to New Jersey, the headlines are piling up. American Bridge has conducted extensive research on each of these Republican governors, diving deep into their records to bring these allegations to light. Our new collection of research on the Republican Party’s best hope for its future shows just how dim that future may really be.

Read more after the jump.

Breaking: Koch Industries’ Outsourcing and Job Loss

In a recent television advertisement Koch Industries touted the growth of the company to create “60,000 American jobs.” The true story paints a picture of Koch Industries’ long history of job losses and outsourcing, resulting in nearly 3,000 American jobs sent overseas.

Outsourcing

Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) is a federal job training program that provides assistance to workers who lose their jobs as a result of competing foreign imports or direct outsourcing.  An analysis of TAA cases, news articles, shipping records, and layoff notices revealed examples of outsourcing at 13 Koch Industries facilities, and potential outsourcing at additional facilities.

  • In 2003, Koch laid off 150 employees at a KoSa plant in Shelby, North Carolina.  In 2004, the Department of Labor certified that a portion of 150 employees who had been laid off at a plant in Shelby, NC, were eligible for TAA as a result of outsourcing to Mexico.  Former employees at the Shelby facility later filed suit against Koch claiming that the company pushed workers to, according to a former worker, “leave gracefully” or “be victims of downsizing.” (Source)
  • In 2004, Koch outsourced 175 jobs from an Invista plant to Mexico, less than a month after purchasing the plant. Koch Industries had promised to retain all employees.  In late 2006 and early 2007 more workers jobs were outsourced to Mexico, as detailed by the US Court of International Trade. (Sources 1, 2, 3, 4)
  • In 2004, some 35 workers were laid off at an Invista plant in Athens, Georgia.  In 2006, they were certified eligible for TAA because of outsourcing to Mexico. In 2008, the plant laid off an additional, 50 employees. (Source)
Read more after the jump.