Dean Heller Has Already Sold Out Nevadans’ Health Care, Over and Over Again

 

Following Dean Heller’s statement on the Senate GOP’s health care bill, American Bridge President Jessica Mackler made the following statement:

“Nevadans will see through Dean Heller’s cowardly attempt to save his political hide. After months of promising to “get to a yes” and repeal Obamacare, Heller has been given a last-minute pass by his party bosses in Washington. But Nevadans know Dean Heller’s record. Heller has voted over 20 times to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which millions of Nevadans depend on. Just as bad, has voted repeatedly to gut Medicaid and has voted eight times to defund Planned Parenthood. Dean Heller has already sold out Nevadans’ health care, over and over again. Next November, trust Nevadans to hold Heller accountable.”

 

Heller’s Opposition To ACHA Is A Craven Attempt To Save His Political Career

Heller’s Career Is On The Line With ACHA Vote

Heller Is In A Political Bind With The ACHA Vote

The Hill: Heller, Seen As The Most Vulnerable GOP Senator, Was “In The Hot Seat” Over ACHA Vote. According to The Hill, “Thursday’s House vote to repeal and replace ObamaCare puts Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) in the hot seat. The House GOP’s American Health Care Act (AHCA) would largely eliminate ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion, which has enrolled hundreds of thousands of Nevadans since 2013. Heller, seen as the most vulnerable GOP senator up for reelection after his state backed Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and freshman Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) in 2016, quickly distanced himself from the current version of the bill. But Heller is stuck in a bind between a conservative base that’s long been promised -ObamaCare repeal and more moderate voters who could exact political revenge if he helps roll back -ObamaCare and its Medicaid expansion.” [The Hill, 5/9/17]

National Journal: Heller Faced A “Political Catch-22 If He Fol­lows Through On The GOP’s Top Pri­or­ity For The Past Sev­en Years—Re­peal­ing And Re­pla­cing Obama­care—He Will Be Put­ting His Polit­ic­al Ca­reer On The Line.” According to National Journal, “Dean Heller faces a polit­ic­al catch-22: If he fol­lows through on the GOP’s top pri­or­ity for the past sev­en years—re­peal­ing and re­pla­cing Obama­care—he will be put­ting his polit­ic­al ca­reer on the line.” [National Journal, 6/21/17]

 

If Heller Votes For ACHA, He Would Deliver On A Promise To His Extreme Republican Base…

National Journal: “If Heller Votes For The Sen­ate Health Care Bill Un­veiled Thursday, The Sen­at­or From Nevada Can Tell His Re­pub­lic­an Base That He De­livered On The Party’s Car­din­al Prom­ise.” According to National Journal, “If Heller votes for the Sen­ate health care bill un­veiled Thursday, the sen­at­or from Nevada can tell his Re­pub­lic­an base that he de­livered on the party’s car­din­al prom­ise. But the bill, known as the Amer­ic­an Health Care Act, is deeply un­pop­u­lar in his state be­cause it would even­tu­ally claw back Obama­care’s ex­pan­sion of Medi­caid, which has ex­ten­ded health in­sur­ance to up­wards of 200,000 low-in­come people in Nevada.” [National Journal, 6/21/17]

The Hill: GOP Health Care Bill Could Be Defining Issue Of The 2018 Midterms … “If Heller Opposes The Plan Too Loudly, He’ll Expose Himself To A Primary Election Challenge. But If He’s Seen As Too Close To It, He’ll Lose The Moderates Who Backed Clinton In 2016.”According to The Hill, “The GOP’s healthcare reform push has already inspired new energy on the left, and last week’s House vote could become one of the defining issues of the 2018 midterms. […] If Heller opposes the plan too loudly, he’ll expose himself to a primary election challenge. But if he’s seen as too close to it, he’ll lose the moderates who backed Clinton in 2016.” [The Hill, 5/9/17]

 

…But Voting For ACHA Would Make Harmful Cuts To Medicaid And Risk Health Care For Thousands Of Nevadans

ACHA Would Phase Out Medicaid Expansion, Which Dropped Nevada’s Uninsured Rate From 20.7 Percent To 12.3 Percent Between 2013 And 2015. According to the Nevada Independent, “Phases out the Medicaid eligibility expansion starting in 2021, ending in 2024. Roughly 276,400 Nevada residents have been covered since Sandoval decided to expand income eligibility for the entitlement program, which dropped the state’s uninsured rate by nearly 40 percent from 20.7 percent to 12.3 percent between 2013 and 2015.” [Nevada Independent,6/22/17]

In Nevada, Medicaid Program Grew 90 Percent Due To ACA Medicaid Expansion. According to National Journal, “The Affordable Care Act expanded Medicaid coverage to adults who earn less than 138 percent of the federal poverty line, and made the federal government pay at least 90 percent of the cost. In Nevada, the Medicaid program has grown by 90 percent since 2013, which is much higher than the nation’s 30-percent increase.” [National Journal, 6/21/17]

 

Heller Repeatedly Pushed For ACA Repeal Risking Nevadans Access To Health Care

Heller Told Nevadans He Wants The ACA Repealed

Heller Told Nevadans He Wants To “Do Everything I Can To Get To A Yes” On ACHA.According to The Hill, “Thursday’s House vote to repeal and replace ObamaCare puts Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) in the hot seat. The House GOP’s American Health Care Act (AHCA) would largely eliminate ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion, which has enrolled hundreds of thousands of Nevadans since 2013. […] Hoping to tie Heller to the plan, Democrats point to leaked audio from a private luncheon last month in Nevada. In the recording, Heller said that he wants to ‘do everything I can to get to a yes’ on the healthcare bill.” [The Hill, 5/9/17]

 

Heller Promised To Repeal The Affordable Care Act

 

Heller Said That If He Was Elected He Would Repeal Obamacare. According to Reno Gazette-Journal, “Speaking in front of a room full of supporters, Republican U.S. Senator Dean Heller told the audience if he is elected, he will not raise taxes, and he will build a Canada-Texas pipeline and repeal Obamacare. The incumbent candidate spoke at the Fernley Republican Campaign Headquarters on Main Street. His speech was peppered with cheers as he made his 20-minute remarks.” [Reno Gazette-Journal, 9/5/12]

Heller: “Nevada Families And Businesses Are Already Struggling In This Current Economic Environment, And The President’s Job-Killing Healthcare Law Is Making A Difficult Situation Worse.” According to Reno Gazette-Journal, “· Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.) statement: ‘Nevada families and businesses are already struggling in this current economic environment, and the President’s job-killing healthcare law is making a difficult situation worse. Congress spent more than a year debating healthcare legislation while Nevadans were losing their jobs and their homes. Obamacare made sweeping changes to Medicare, impacting thousands of Nevada’s seniors, and cut the program by a half trillion dollars.” [Reno Gazette-Journal, 6/29/12]

Heller Said The Healthcare Law Was “Onerous” And “The President Should Work With Congress To Find Real Solutions To Healthcare Reform So The Excessive Mandates And Taxes In This Law Do Not Further Add To Our National Debt Or Continue To Stifle Economic Growth.” According to Reno Gazette-Journal, Heller said “‘This law has now been affirmed as a colossal tax increase on the middle class, and its excessive regulations are stripping businesses of the certainty they need to hire at a time when Nevadans and the rest of the country are desperate for jobs. The President should work with Congress to find real solutions to healthcare reform so the excessive mandates and taxes in this law do not further add to our national debt or continue to stifle economic growth. This onerous law needs to be repealed and replaced with market-based reforms that will provide greater access, affordability, and economic certainty to our nation.’” [Reno Gazette-Journal, 6/29/12]

Heller Said That Obamacare Had To Be Repealed “In Order To Restore Prosperity In Nevada. According to DeanHeller.com, “In order to restore prosperity to Nevada, we must end the policies that caused these problems in the first place. We can, and we must, reclaim the American entrepreneurial spirit that encourages small businesses to grow: Eliminate job-killing regulations; Repeal Obamacare; Pass a Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution; End the bailout culture in Washington” [DeanHeller.com, Archived 3/6/12]

Heller Voted At Least 20 Times To Repeal And Undermine The Affordable Care Act

2017: Heller Voted For A Budget Resolution Designed To Begin The Process Of Repealing The Affordable Care Act, Which Also Assumes A $9 Trillion Increase In The Federal Debt Over The Next Ten Years. In January 2017, Heller voted for a budget resolution designed to begin reconciliation instructions to repeal the Affordable Care Act. According to Congressional Quarterly, “the proposed 10-year spending framework culminates in a $1 trillion annual deficit and adds about $9 trillion to the national debt.” The vote was on passage. The Senate passed the budget resolution by a vote of 51 to 48. The House later passed the resolution. [Senate Vote 26,1/12/17; Congressional Quarterly, 1/4/17; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 3]

2017: Heller Effectively Voted For A Budget Resolution Designed To Begin The Process Of Repealing The Affordable Care Act. In January 2017, Heller effectively voted for a budget resolution designed to begin reconciliation instructions to repeal the Affordable Care Act. According to Congressional Quarterly, “The Senate on Wednesday voted 51-48 to move ahead in debating a fiscal 2017 budget resolution that would include reconciliation instructions repealing the 2010 health care law (PL 111-148, PL 111-152).” The vote was on a motion to proceed. The Senate agreed to the motion by a vote of 51 to 48. The Senate later passed the resolution. [Senate Vote 1, 1/4/17; Congressional Quarterly, 1/4/17; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 3]

2015: Heller Voted For A Bill That Repealed Portions Of The Affordable Care Act, Including Eliminating The Act’s Medicaid Expansion In 2018. In December 2015, Heller voted for a bill that according to Congressional Quarterly, would have “scrap[ed] in 2018 the law’s Medicaid expansion, as well as subsidies to help individuals buy coverage through the insurance exchanges.” Additionally, according to Congressional Quarterly the bill would have “repeal[ed] portions of the 2010 health care law and block[ed] federal funding for Planned Parenthood for one year. As amended, the bill would zero-out the law’s penalties for noncompliance with the law’s requirements for most individuals to obtain health coverage and employers to offer health insurance.” The vote was on passage of a reconciliation bill. The Senate approved the bill by a vote of 52 to 47. The bill was later passed by the full Congress, which the president then vetoed. The House was not able to override the veto. [Senate Vote 329, 12/3/15; Congressional Quarterly, 12/3/15; Real Clear Politics, 12/4/15 Congressional Actions, H.R. 3762]

2015: Heller Effectively Voted To Repeal The Affordable Care Act. In July 2015, Heller effectively voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. According to Congressional Quarterly, the vote was on a “Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on [the amendment] […] that would repeal the 2010 health care law.” The underlying bill was a three-year highway funding bill. The vote was on a motion to invoke cloture. The Senate rejected the motion 49 to 43; 60 Senators voting yes would have been required to invoke cloture. [Senate Vote 253, 7/26/15; Congressional Quarterly, 7/26/15; The Hill, 7/26/15; Congressional Actions, S. 2328; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 2327; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 2266; Congressional Actions, H.R. 22]

2015: Heller Voted To Repeal The Affordable Care Act, As Part Of The FY 2016 Conference Report Budget Resolution. In May 2015, Heller voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act as part of the FY 2016 Conference Report budget resolution. According to Congressional Quarterly, “Adoption of the conference report on the concurrent resolution that would reduce spending by $5.3 trillion over the next 10 years, including $2 trillion in reductions from repeal of the 2010 health care overhaul.” The vote was on the Conference Report; the Conference Report, which also passed the House, was passed by a vote of 51 to 48. [Senate Vote 171, 5/5/15; Congressional Quarterly, 5/5/15; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 11]

  • Budget Includes Reconciliation Language To Repeal The Affordable Care Act.According to Congressional Quarterly, “The budget contains reconciliation instructions directing the committees with jurisdiction over taxes and health care to draw up legislation to repeal the health care law and deliver their recommendations to the Budget committees by July 24.” [Congressional Quarterly, 5/5/15]
  • Reconciliation Would Prevent Senate Democrats From Filibustering. According to Politico, “Senate Republicans want to use a powerful budget maneuver known as reconciliation to go after President Barack Obama’s health care law — particularly if the Supreme Court strikes down key provisions of Obamacare this June. Using the fast-tracking procedure offers some advantage for Republicans, largely because a reconciliation package can’t be filibustered. [Politico, 3/18/15]
  • Center For Budget And Policy Priorities: Budget Would Eliminate Health Coverage For Millions Of Americans. According to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, “The House-passed budget agreement that the Senate will consider next week would repeal health reform and cut Medicaid over the coming decade by roughly half a trillion dollars on top, making tens of millions more Americans uninsured.” [Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, 5/1/15]

2015: Heller Voted To Repeal The Affordable Care Act, As Part Of The Senate’s FY 2016 Budget Resolution. In March 2015, Heller voted for the Senate’s FY 2016 budget resolution, which, according to the Senate Budget Committee, included provisions that “provide for the repeal of Obamacare and support legislation to replace Obamacare with reserve funds for legislation that strengthens the doctor-patient relationship, expands choice, and lowers health care costs.” The Senate adopted the budget resolution by a vote of 52 to 46. A final budget resolution included the policy. [Senate Vote 135, 3/27/15; Senate Budget Committee, 3/18/15; Congressional Quarterly, 4/30/15; S. Con. Res. 11, 4/7/15; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 11]

  • Budget Permitted Use Of Reconciliation Procedures To Repeal The ACA, Which Would Prevent Senate Democrats From Filibustering The Repeal Bill. According to Politico, “Senate Republicans want to use a powerful budget maneuver known as reconciliation to go after President Barack Obama’s health care law — particularly if the Supreme Court strikes down key provisions of Obamacare this June. Using the fast-tracking procedure offers some advantage for Republicans, largely because a reconciliation package can’t be filibustered. […] The plans were included in a budget blueprint rolled out Wednesday by the Senate Budget Committee — a governing document that calls for balancing the budget within a decade, extracting hundreds of billions in savings from Medicare and turning over more responsibility to the states to run Medicaid, reducing costs even further.” [Politico, 3/18/15]

2013: Heller Voted To Repeal The Affordable Care Act And The Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. In March 2013, Heller voted for an amendment that, according to Huffington Post, “sought to ‘establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide for the repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.’” The amendment was to the Senate Budget for FY 2014. The vote was on the amendment, which the Senate rejected by a vote of 45 to 54. [Senate Vote 51, 3/22/13; Huffington Post, 3/22/13; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 202; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 8]

2013: Heller Voted To Block Implementation And Enforcement Of The Affordable Care Act.In March 2013, Heller voted for an amendment to a bill funding the federal government through the end of fiscal year 2013, that, according to the Congressional Record,  would have required that “[n]one of the funds made available in this Act may be used (1) to carry out any provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act […] or title I or subtitle B of title II of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 […], or the amendments made by such Act, title, or subtitle; or (2) for rulemaking under such Act, title, or subtitle.” The Senate rejected the amendment by a vote of 45 to 52. [Senate Vote 34, 3/13/13; Congressional Record, 3/13/13; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 30; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 26; Congressional Actions, H.R. 933]

  • Sen. Cruz Offered The Amendment “To Advance Economic Growth And To Delay Funding For Obamacare Until There Is Economic Growth.” According to The Hill’s Floor Action Blog, “Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) offered the first amendment to the continued spending resolution that funds the government through the fiscal year. Cruz said his amendment would prohibit funding for the Affordable Care Act until the economy is growing at the ‘historic’ level of at least 3-4 percent. ‘The purpose of this amendment is to advance economic growth and to delay funding for ObamaCare until there is economic growth,’ Cruz said Wednesday. ‘At a minimum, ObamaCare should not be funded when our economy is gasping for breath.’” [The Hill’s Floor Action Blog, 3/13/13]
  • Opponents Of The Amendment Argued That It “Is Equivalent To Repeal” Of Health Care Reform. According to The Hill’s Floor Action Blog, “Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) said the amendment ‘is equivalent to repeal,’ when speaking against Cruz’s amendment. ‘This is the 34th time that someone on the Republican side has tried to do away with the Affordable Care Act and it’s failed every time,’ Harkin said. ‘We’ve already made our decisions on that and we’re moving on. ‘It’s almost like there is an obsession with some people on the other side of the aisle with tearing down health reform.’” [The Hill’s Floor Action Blog, 3/13/13]

2011: Heller Voted For A Republican Jobs Proposal Known As The “Jobs Through Growth Act” That Included A Provision To Repeal The Affordable Care Act. In November 2011, Heller voted for an amendment that would have put in place a number of Republican policy priorities. According to The Hill, “The ‘Jobs Through Growth Act,’ penned by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) […] included a Sense of the Congress that a balanced budget to the Constitution is needed, a provision to make it easier for the government to rescind unspent funds and a reduction in taxes for individuals and companies. It also would have repealed last year’s healthcare law and the Dodd-Frank financial reform law.” The amendment was a second-degree amendment to a bill to end the withholding requirement for payments to government contractors. The Senate rejected the amendment by a vote of 40 to 56. [Senate Vote 202, 11/10/11; The Hill, 11/10/11; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 928; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 927; Congressional Actions, H.R. 674]

2011: Heller Voted To Consider Sen. Pat Toomey’s FY 2012 Budget, Which Repealed The Affordable Care Act. In May 2011, Heller voted to consider repealing the Affordable Care Act, as part of Sen. Pat Toomey’s (R-PA) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2012 to 2021. According to a press release from Sen. Toomey, the budget contained a provision that “Repeals Obamacare.” The vote was on a motion to proceed to consider the resolution; the motion failed by a vote of 42 to 55. [Senate Vote 79, 5/25/11; Office of Senator Pat Toomey, 5/10/11; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 21]

2011: Heller Effectively Voted For FY 2012 Ryan Budget, Which Would Have Repealed The Affordable Care Act. In May 2011, Heller effectively voted for repealing the Affordable Care Act, as part of House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2012 to 2021. According to the House Budget Committee, the budget would “repeal the government takeover of healthcare.” The vote was on a motion to proceed to consider the House-passed budget resolution, which the Senate rejected by a vote of 40 to 57. [Senate Vote 77, 5/25/11; House Budget Committee, 4/5/11; Congressional Actions, H. Con. Res. 34]

2011: Heller Voted For FY 2012 Ryan Budget, Which Would Have Repealed The Affordable Care Act. In April 2011, Heller voted for repealing the Affordable Care Act, as part of  House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2012 to 2021. According to the House Budget Committee, the budget would “repeal the government takeover of healthcare.” The vote was on passage; the resolution passed by a vote of 235 to 193. [House Vote 277, 4/15/11; House Budget Committee, 4/5/11; Congressional Actions, H. Con. Res. 34]

2011: Heller Voted To Repeal The Affordable Care Act. In April 2011, Heller voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act as part of the Democrats’ proposed budget resolution covering FY 2012 to 2021. According the text of the budget resolution, “It is the policy of the House that the law of the land should support making affordable health care coverage available to every American family, and therefore the Affordable Care Act should not be repealed.” The vote was on an amendment to the House budget resolution replacing the entire budget with the House Democrats’ proposed budget; the amendment failed by a vote of 166 to 259. [House Vote 276, 4/15/11; Congressional Record, 4/15/11; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 259; Congressional Actions, H. Con. Res. 34]

2011: Heller Voted To Prohibit Funds From An Appropriations Bill From Being Used For The Affordable Care Act. In April 2011, Heller voted for a resolution that, according to Congressional Quarterly, “would [have] direct[ed] the House clerk to make a correction in the enrollment of a bill (HR 1473) to provide $1.055 trillion in discretionary funding for fiscal 2011, and insert a section that would [have] bar[red] the use of funds made available in the bill to carry out the provisions of the 2010 health care overhaul law.” The House agreed to the resolution by a vote of 240 to 185. The Senate disagreed with the resolution and no further action was taken. [House Vote 270, 4/14/11; Congressional Quarterly, 4/14/11; Congressional Actions, H. Con. Res. 35]

  • Opponents Argued The Measure Was Designed To Stop Health Care Reform And That The Measure Would Have Adverse Effects On Job Creation And Deficit Reduction.According to the Congressional Record Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) said, “Mr. Speaker, instead of working to create jobs, reduce the deficit and do the business of the American people, this majority has been consumed for months now with trying to repeal health care reform. Like the attempted repeal we saw in the first week of this Congress, like the Tea Party budget passed in February and like the many attempts we have seen to decimate health care reform piece by piece since, this concurrent resolution, once again, tries to take away the consumer protection of the Affordable Care Act and tries to put insurance companies back in charge. […] It is a further demonstration of the majority’s special interest priorities and of their hypocrisy on job creation and deficit reduction. Passing this resolution will destroy jobs in the health professions. It will slow job growth by 250,000 to 400,000 jobs a year. It will increase medical spending and add nearly $2,000 to the average family’s insurance premium. According to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, it will add $230 billion to the deficit within 10 years and $1 trillion more within 20 years. Let me repeat that. This amendment adds billions and ultimately trillions of dollars to the deficit, starting with $5.5 billion this year.” [Congressional Record, 4/14/11]

2011: Heller Voted To Block The Implementation Of The Affordable Care Act. In February 2011, Heller voted for a bill that would have, blocked implementation of the Affordable Care Act. According to the Tulsa World, the bill contained an amendment to H.R. 1 that was “sponsored by Rep. Dennis Rehberg, R-Mont., to the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act. The amendment would bar spending on efforts to implement the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or title I or subtitle B of title II of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act. The House passed the bill by a vote of 235 to 189. The Senate extensively amended the legislation and passed the bill, but it was not taken up again by the House. The final version of the fiscal year 2011 funding bill stripped the rider that defunded the Affordable Care Act. According to Roll Call, “Democratic aides argued the Senate Democrats’ unity is a sign of just how successful the Nevada Democrat was in negotiating for his Conference’s priorities and said it will help him with the debt limit. The final deal stripped the most significant riders, such as defunding the health care law, and protected Democratic spending priorities, including health care research and Head Start.” [House Vote 147, 2/19/11; Tulsa World, 2/27/11; Roll Call, 4/18/11; Congressional Actions, H.R. 1]

2011: Heller Voted To Defund The Affordable Care Act. In February 2011, Heller voted for an amendment that would have, according to Congressional Quarterly, “prohibit[ed] the use of funds made available by the bill to pay the salary of any officer or employee of any federal department or agency with respect to carrying out the provisions of the 2010 health care overhaul and reconciliation laws, or any amendment made by those law.” The underlying bill pertained to continuing appropriations for FY 2011. The vote was on adopting the amendment; the House adopted the amendment by a vote of 237 to 191. The House passed the underlying bill and the Senate amended the bill, but it was not taken up by the House again. [House Vote 99, 2/18/11; Congressional Quarterly, 2/18/11; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 105; Congressional Actions,H.R. 1]

2011: Heller Voted To Bar The Use Of Funds To Implement The Affordable Care Act. In February 2011, Heller voted for an amendment that would have, according to Congressional Quarterly, “bar[red] the use of funds made available by the bill to carry out the provisions of the 2010 health care overhaul and reconciliation laws, or any amendment made by those laws.”  The underlying bill pertained to continuing appropriations for FY 2011. The vote was on adopting the amendment; the House passed the amendment by a vote of 241 to 187.  The House passed the underlying bill and the Senate amended the bill, but it was not taken up by the House again. [House Vote 98, 2/18/11; Congressional Quarterly, 2/18/11; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 104; Congressional Actions, H.R. 1]

2011: Heller Effectively Voted To Defund The Affordable Care Act. In February 2011, Heller voted for an amendment that would have, according to Congressional Quarterly, “prohibit[ed] the payment of any funds made available by the bill to any employee, officer, contractor or grantee of any department or agency funded by the Labor-HHS-Education portion of the measure to implement the 2010 health care overhaul law.”  The underlying bill pertained to continuing appropriations for FY 2011. The vote was on adopting the amendment; the House passed the amendment by a vote of 239 to 187. The House passed the underlying bill and the Senate amended the bill, but it was not taken up by the House again. [House Vote 97, 2/18/11; Congressional Quarterly, 2/18/11; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 102; Congressional Actions,H.R. 1]

2011: Heller Voted To Instruct Four House Committees To Report Legislation To The House That Would Replace Elements Of The Affordable Care Act. In January 2011, Heller voted for a resolution that, according to Congressional Quarterly, “instruct[ed] the Education and the Workforce, Energy and Commerce, Judiciary, and Ways and Means committees to report legislation to the House that would replace elements of the health care law. The changes would include provisions aimed at lowering the costs of health insurance premiums, overhauling the medical liability system, prohibiting taxpayer funding of abortions and making permanent changes to the formula used to determine Medicare physician payment rates.” The vote was on agreeing to the resolution. The House passed the resolution by a vote of 253 to 175. [House Vote 16,1/20/11; Congressional Quarterly, 1/20/11; Congressional Actions, H. Res. 9]

  • Republicans Labeled The Vote As Their Next Step To “Repeal And Replace” The Affordable Care Act. According to Congressional Quarterly, “Republicans said the resolution was the next step in their plan to ‘repeal and replace’ the health care law.” [Congressional Quarterly, 1/20/11]

2011: Heller Voted To Repeal The Affordable Care Act. In January 2011, Heller voted for a bill that, according to Congressional Quarterly, “would [have] repeal[ed] the 2010 health care overhaul law, which requires most individuals to buy health insurance by 2014, makes changes to government health care programs and sets new requirements for health insurers. The bill would restore the provisions of law amended or repealed by the health care overhaul, and repeal certain provisions of the health care reconciliation law.” The House passed the bill by a vote of 245 to 189; however, the Senate did not take any action on it. [House Vote 14, 1/19/11; Congressional Quarterly, 1/19/11; Congressional Actions, H.R. 2]

 

The Affordable Care Act Increased Nevadans Access To Health Care…

The Uninsured Rate In Nevada Dropped From 20 Percent In 2013 To 15.7 Percent In 2014.“Reducing the number of uninsured Americans: Nationwide, since the Affordable Care Act’s coverage expansion began, about 16.4 million uninsured people have gained health insurance coverage – the largest reduction in the uninsured in four decades. And Gallup recently announced that the uninsured rate in Nevada in 2014 was 15.7 percent, down from 20.0 percent in 2013.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

More Than 73,000 Nevadans Were Enrolled In Health Insurance Through The Exchange. In Nevada, 73,596 consumers selected or were automatically re-enrolled in quality, affordable health insurance coverage through the Marketplace as of Feb. 22.  Nationwide, nearly 11.7 million consumers selected a plan or were automatically enrolled in Marketplace coverage.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

89 Percent of Nevadans Who Enrolled In Health Insurance Through The Exchange Qualified For A Tax Credit Of $242 Per Month. “Marketplace Signups and Tax Credits in Nevada: 89 percent of Nevada consumers who were signed up qualified for an average tax credit of $242 per month through the Marketplace.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

53 Percent Of Nevadans Obtained Coverage For $100 Or Less Per Month After Any Applicable Tax Credits, “Marketplace Signups and Tax Credits in Nevada: […] 53 percent of Nevada Marketplace enrollees obtained coverage for $100 or less after any applicable tax credits in 2015, and 100 percent had the option of doing so.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

208,774 Nevadans Have Gained Medicaid Or CHIP Coverage Because Of Medicaid Expansion. “Thirty states plus DC have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, including Nevada. And as of January 2015, 208,774 Nevadans have gained Medicaid or CHIP coverage since the beginning of the Health Insurance Marketplace first open enrollment period. Across the nation, approximately 11.2 million more Americans are now enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

 

The ACA Allows Young Americans To Stay On Their Parents Health Care Plans…

 

Under The Affordable Care Act, Young People Can Stay On Their Parents’ Health Insurance Until Age 26, Which Has Benefitted More Than 2.6 Million Who Would Otherwise Have Been Uninsured. “New coverage options for young adults: Under the health care law, if your plan covers children, you can now add or keep your children on your health insurance policy until they turn 26 years old. Thanks to this provision, over 2.3 million young people who would otherwise have been uninsured have gained coverage nationwide.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

 

…Stops Insurance Companies From Charging Women More Than Men…

 

Under Health Care Reform, Insurance Companies Cannot Charge Women More Than Men.“So, there is evidence that some women buying health insurance in the individual market, a key target of Obamacare, are charged 50 percent more than men for the same coverage. Such gender rating is made illegal under the health reform law.” [PolitiFact, 10/6/13]

Starting In 2014, Insurance Companies In The Individual And Small Group Markets Were No Longer Be Permitted To Charge Women Higher Rates Because Of The ACA. “Currently, 37 states allow gender rating in the individual market, which means insurers can charge women and men different premiums for identical coverage.4 In the capital cities of these states, 92 percent of bestselling plans charged 40-year-old women more than they charged 40-year-old men for the same plan.5 Maternity coverage cannot explain the difference in premiums because only 3 percent of these plans included maternity services.6 Under the Affordable Care Act, beginning in 2014, this unfair practice will no longer be permitted and the costs of coverage for men and women are required to be equal.” [Families USA, 5/13]

 

…Prevents Discrimination Against Nevadans With Pre-Existing Conditions….

 

Under The Affordable Care Act, Health Insurance Companies Are Banned From Discriminating Against People With Pre-Existing Conditions – As Many As 1,157,045 Non-Elderly Nevadans Have Some Type Of Pre-Existing Health Condition, Including 162,452Children. “Ending discrimination for pre-existing conditions: As many as 1,157,045 non-elderly Nevadans have some type of pre-existing health condition, including 162,452 children.  Today, health insurers can no longer deny coverage to anyone because of a pre-existing condition, like asthma or diabetes, under the health care law.  And they can no longer charge women more because of their gender.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

 

… And It Requires Coverage Of Essential Benefits, Like Preventative Care And Prescription Drugs

 

Under The Affordable Care Act, Health Insurance Companies Must Cover Ten Essential Health Benefits, Including Hospitalization, Prescription Drugs, Maternity And Newborn Care, And Mental Health And Substance Use Disorder Services. “Expanding mental health and substance use disorder benefits: The Affordable Care Act increases also access to comprehensive coverage by requiring most health plans to cover ten essential health benefit categories, to include hospitalization, prescription drugs, maternity and newborn care, and mental health and substance use disorder services.  The health care law expands mental health and substance use disorder benefits and federal parity protections for 62 million Americans nationwide, including 550,516 Nevadans.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

Under The Affordable Care Act, Many Health Insurance Plans Provide Preventive Health Services Without Co-Pays, Including Things Like Cancer Screenings And Flu Shots. “The health care law requires many insurance plans to provide coverage without cost sharing to enrollees for a variety of preventive health services, such as colonoscopy screening for colon cancer, Pap smears and mammograms for women, well-child visits, and flu shots for all children and adults. Because of the Affordable Care Act, 76 million Americans with private health insurance gained preventive service coverage with no cost-sharing, including 633,000 in Nevada. And women can now get coverage without cost-sharing of even more preventive services they need.  Of the 76 million Americans with expanded access to free preventive services, 29.7 million are women, including 222,000 in Nevada receiving expanded preventive services without cost-sharing.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

633,000 Nevadans, Including 222,000 Women, Can Get Coverage Without Cost-Sharing Of More Preventive Services. Because of the Affordable Care Act, 76 million Americans with private health insurance gained preventive service coverage with no cost-sharing, including 633,000 in Nevada. And women can now get coverage without cost-sharing of even more preventive services they need.  Of the 76 million Americans with expanded access to free preventive services, 29.7 million are women, including 222,000 in Nevada receiving expanded preventive services without cost-sharing.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

  • ACA’s Expanded Preventative Health Services Without Cost-Sharing Included Contraception And Mammograms. “Under the preventive services provisions in the Affordable Care Act, non-grandfathered health insurance plans and policies are required to cover 100 percent of the costs of certain recommended preventive services for women—that is, without charging a co-pay, co-insurance, deductible, or other cost sharing. […] The Guidelines include annual well-woman visits; screening for gestational diabetes; human papillomavirus DNA testing; counseling for sexually transmitted infections; HIV counseling and screening; FDA-approved contraceptive methods and counseling; breastfeeding support, supplies, and counseling; and screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence.” [Department of Health & Human Services, 1/27/14]

 

Heller Votes To Repeal ACA Would End Medicaid Expansion….

Republicans ACA Repeal Plan Included Eliminating Medicaid Coverage For Millions Of Americans. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “Congressional Republicans indicate they will repeal key sections of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) early next year, including its Medicaid expansion.  Repealing the Medicaid expansion would eliminate health coverage for up to, and quite possibly more than, 11 million low-income Americans in the 31 states (plus the District of Columbia) that have taken up this option.  It would also cut off the possibility of gaining coverage for the 4 million uninsured people in the remaining 19 states who would become Medicaid-eligible if their state expanded. Without the Medicaid expansion, low-income people across the country, many of whom have received needed primary care and treatment for serious conditions like cancer and drug addiction under the expansion, would be left as they were before health reform, with no pathway to affordable health coverage.” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 12/22/16]

 

…And Heller Votes For Republican Budgets would Cut Medcaid Even Further

Republican Budgets Would Cut Medicaid Funding Another 26 Percent Beyond Medicaid Expansion. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “The Medicaid block grant proposal in the budget plan proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan on April 1 would cut federal Medicaid (and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP) funding by 26 percent by 2024, because the funding would no longer keep pace with health care costs or with expected Medicaid enrollment growth as the population ages.  (See Figure 1.)  These cuts would come on top of repealing the health reform law’s Medicaid expansion.” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 4/4/14]

 

Heller Voted Repeatedly For Medicaid Cuts And For Plans To Block Grant the Program

Heller Supported GOP Plan To Block Grant Medicaid. According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal: “A health care advocacy group sounded a warning Thursday for Nevada, saying a plan to convert Medicaid into state block grants would lead to $6.9 billion in cuts to the Silver State over the next decade. […] The Republican plan ‘would require larger and larger Medicaid cuts over time, just as more seniors require Medicaid and health care costs continue to rise,’ Democrats said. But Republicans in their budget plan said Medicaid ‘is coming apart at the seams, and costs will be ‘nearly impossible to check’ without changes. Medicaid costs in 2009 were $378.6 billion, said the proposal authored by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. Absent reform, costs are expected to reach $840 billion by 2019. […] Nevada Republican Reps. Dean Heller and Joe Heck said this week they supported the plan.” [Las Vegas Review-Journal, 4/7/11]

2015: Heller Voted To Cut Medicaid By About $500 Billion Over Ten Years, $1.35 Trillion Including Obamacare Reductions As Part Of The FY 2016 Conference Report Budget Resolution. In May 2015, Heller voted to cut Medicaid by about $500 billion over ten years as part of the FY 2016 conference report budget resolution. According to the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, “The budget agreement would also deeply cut the rest of Medicaid.  While it doesn’t clearly say by how much, the cut appears to be roughly $500 billion (or about 13 percent) over ten years.  (The total Medicaid cut, including repeal of the Medicaid expansion, would be about $1.35 trillion, relative to current law, over that period.).” The vote was on the Conference Report; the Conference Report, which also passed the House, was passed by a vote of 51 to 48. [Senate Vote 171, 5/5/15; Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, 5/1/15; Congressional Actions,S. Con. Res. 11]

2015: Heller Voted To Transform Most Of Medicaid Into A Block Grant And Cutting Medicaid Funding By About $400 Billion Over Ten Years. In March 2015, Heller voted for the Senate’s FY 2016 budget resolution. According to the an Edwin Park post on the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities blog Off the Charts, “Like House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price’s budget plan, Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike Enzi’s new plan proposes to radically restructure Medicaid by converting much of it into two block grants and cutting federal Medicaid funding by roughly $400 billion over the next decade. And like the Price plan, it would repeal health reform’s Medicaid expansion. The combined Medicaid cut would exceed $1.3 trillion over ten years, relative to current law, leaving millions of Americans uninsured or underinsured.” The Senate adopted the budget resolution by a vote of 52 to 46. A final budget resolution did not specify any changes on Medicaid. [Senate Vote 135, 3/27/15; Park post, Off the Charts blog,3/19/15; Congressional Quarterly, 4/30/15; S. Con. Res. 11, 4/7/15; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 11]

2013: Heller Voted For Replacing Guaranteed Medicaid Payments To States With A Block Grant As Part Of The FY 2014 Ryan Budget. In March 2013, Heller voted for converting Medicaid to a block grant, as part of House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2014 to 2023. According to the House Budget Committee, “The budget resolution proposes to transform Medicaid from an open-ended entitlement into a block-granted program like State Children’s Health Insurance Program.” The vote was on the House Republicans’ fiscal year 2014 budget resolution, which Senate Budget Committee chairwoman Patty Murray offered as a substitute amendment to the Senate’s fiscal year 2014 budget resolution. The Senate rejected the amendment by a vote of 40 to 59. [Senate Vote 46, 3/21/13; House Budget Committee, 3/12/13; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 433; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 8]

  • Ryan Budget Block Granted Medicaid, Cutting It By Nearly A Third. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities: “The Medicaid block grant proposal in the budget plan proposed by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, which the House of Representatives passed on March 21, would cut federal Medicaid (and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP) funding by 31 percent by 2023, because the funding would no longer keep pace with health care costs or with expected Medicaid enrollment growth as the population ages (see Figure 1).  These cuts would come on top of repealing the health reform law’s Medicaid expansion.” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 3/26/13]

2012: Heller Effectively Voted To Replace Guaranteed Medicaid Payments To States With A Block Grant As Part Of The FY 2013 Ryan Budget. In May 2012, Heller effectively voted to convert Medicaid to a block grant, as part of House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2013 to 2022. According to the Congressional Research Service, “Another ‘illustrative policy option’ included in the House Budget Committee report (H. Rept. 112-421) is restructuring Medicaid from an individual entitlement program to a block grant program. Few details are available regarding the specific design of the proposed block grant. The proposal indicates that (1) federal funding to states would increase annually according to inflation (CPI-U) and population growth, and (2) states would be provided additional flexibility to design and administer their Medicaid programs.” The vote was on a motion to proceed to consider the House-passed budget resolution, which the Senate rejected by a vote of 41 to 58. [House Vote 277, 4/15/11; CRS, 3/29/12; Congressional Actions,H. Con. Res. 112]

  • Under Ryan’s Similar FY2012 Block Grant Proposal, Estimated That Between 14 And 27 Million People Would Lose Medicaid Coverage By 2021. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “The Urban Institute estimated that a similar Medicaid block grant proposal that Chairman Ryan included in his budget last year would lead states to drop between 14 million and 27 million people from Medicaid by 2021 (on top of the coverage losses resulting from repealing the health reform law’s Medicaid expansion).” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 3/20/12]

2011: Heller Voted To Consider Sen. Pat Toomey’s FY 2012 Budget, Which Turned Medicaid From An Guaranteed Entitlement Into A Block Grant. In May 2011, Heller voted to consider turning Medicaid into a block grant program, as part of Sen. Pat Toomey’s (R-PA) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2012 to 2021. According to Sen. Toomey’s “Restoring Balance,” the budget “implement[ed] a block-grant program to the states” for Medicaid.  The vote was on a motion to proceed to consider the resolution; the motion failed by a vote of 42 to 55. [Senate Vote 79, 5/25/11; Restoring Balance, 5/10/11; Congressional Actions, S. Con. Res. 21]

  • CBPP: Toomey’s Cuts To Medicaid Were $326 Billion Larger Than Ryan’s Proposed Cuts Over A Ten Year Period, “Would Shift Huge Costs To The States,” Lead To Cuts In Poor Elderly, Disabled, Children Served, And In Services They Received. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “This would shift huge costs to the states and force cuts in the number of poor elderly, disabled, and children served and the services they receive. Senator Toomey’s Medicaid cuts, not counting those related to health reform, are $326 billion larger than the proposed $771 billion cut over ten years in the Ryan plan.” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 5/25/11]
  • CBPP: Block Grant Programs Like One In Rep. Ryan’s FY 2012 Budget Would Cause Between 14 And 27 Million People To Lose Medicaid Coverage By 2021. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “the Urban Institute estimated that a similar Medicaid block grant proposal that Chairman Ryan included in his budget last year would lead states to drop between 14 million and 27 million people from Medicaid by 2021 (on top of the coverage losses resulting from repealing the health reform law’s Medicaid expansion).” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 3/20/12]

2011: Heller Effectively Voted For FY 2012 Ryan Budget, Which Would Have Converted Medicaid To A Block Grant And Eliminated Federal Coverage Mandates. In February 2011, Heller effectively voted for converting Medicaid to a block grant and eliminating federal coverage mandates, as part of House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) proposed budget resolution covering fiscal years 2012 to 2021. According to the House Budget Committee, the budget would “convert the federal share of Medicaid spending into a block grant tailored to meet each state’s needs, indexed for inflation and population growth. […] States will no longer be shackled by federally determined program requirements and enrollment criteria. Instead, they will have the freedom and flexibility to tailor a Medicaid program that fits the needs of their unique populations.” The vote was on a motion to proceed to consider the House-passed budget resolution, which the Senate rejected by a vote of 40 to 57. [House Vote 147, 2/19/11; House Budget Committee, 4/5/11; Congressional Actions, H. Con. Res. 34]

  • Ryan Budget Block Granted Medicaid, Cutting It By More Than A Third. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities: “House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s budget plan, which the House passed on April 15, would dramatically restructure Medicaid by converting it to a block grant and cutting the program’s funding sharply.  According to the Congressional Budget Office, the Ryan budget would reduce federal funding by 35 percent in 2022 and by 49 percent in 2030, compared to what the funding would otherwise be.  This would almost certainly affect tens of millions of low-income Medicaid beneficiaries adversely over time.” [Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 5/3/11]

 

Medicaid Provided Health Care Coverage For More Than 630,000 Nevadans

Nevada Enrolled 631,128 Individuals In Medicaid And CHIP. According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, “As of March 2017, Nevada has enrolled 631,128 individuals in Medicaid and CHIP — a net increase of 89.78% since the first Marketplace Open Enrollment Period and related Medicaid program changes in October 2013. Nevada has adopted one or more of the targeted enrollment strategies outlined in guidance CMS issued on May 17, 2013, designed to facilitate enrollment in Medicaid and CHIP.” [Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Medicaid Nevada Webpage, Viewed 6/22/17]

 

June 2017: Heller Announced He Supported Ending Medicaid Expansion, Which Provided Health Insurance To More Than 200,000 Nevadans

Heller Told Reporters Supported A Seven Year Phase-Out Of Medicaid Expansion.According to The Hill, “Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.), a key GOP senator on healthcare who is up for reelection next year, said Thursday that he supports a seven-year phase-out of funding for ObamaCare’s expansion of Medicaid. ‘I support seven, I support seven,’ Heller told reporters on his way into a healthcare working group meeting in the Capitol. ‘So do a number of us, including [Sen. Rob] Portman [R-Ohio] and others who have been working on this.’” [Hill, 6/8/17]

  • The Hill Headline: Sen. Heller Supports Seven-Year Phase-Out Of Medicaid Expansion Funds [Hill, 6/8/17]

Heller Spokesperson Confirmed Heller Now Supports A Seven-Year Phase Out Of Medicaid Expansion. According to Reno-Gazette Journal, “A spokesperson for Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., said Friday that the senator did tell The Hill that he supported a seven-year phase out of the Medicaid expansion, but added his comments come in the middle of a negotiation that’s still ongoing. Spokesperson Megan Taylor also said Heller wants to give Nevada as much time as possible for a potential rollback of the Medicaid expansion. That means he doesn’t support a rollback of the program over two years, which is currently in the bill passed by the House. ‘Two years is not going to work for the state of Nevada,’ Taylor said. ‘He’s been talking to the governor, we’ve been in close contact with the governor’s office to see what is something Nevada could live with.’ She added, ‘The senator wants to make sure Nevada has as much time as possible.’” [Reno-Gazette Journal, 6/8/17]

  • Headline: “Update: Heller Indicates Support For Seven-Year Rollback Of Medicaid Expansion.” [Reno-Gazette Journal, 6/8/17]

Heller Indicated He Supports A Seven-Year Phaseout Of Medicaid Expansion. According to New York Times, “Among the senators indicating support for a seven-year phaseout are three Republican senators from Medicaid expansion states: Mr. Portman, Dean Heller of Nevada and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia. More than a million people have gained coverage through the expansion of Medicaid in those states.” [New York Times, 6/12/17]

 

Medicaid Expansion Provided Health Coverage To Over 200,000 Nevadans

208,774 Nevadans Have Gained Medicaid Or CHIP Coverage Because Of Medicaid Expansion. “Thirty states plus DC have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, including Nevada. And as of January 2015, 208,774 Nevadans have gained Medicaid or CHIP coverage since the beginning of the Health Insurance Marketplace first open enrollment period. Across the nation, approximately 11.2 million more Americans are now enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP.” [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Care – Nevada, 11/2/15]

 

Heller Supported Defunding Planned Parenthood

Heller Voted Eight Times To Defund Planned Parenthood, Which Provides Health Care To 16,000 Nevadans

2015: Heller Voted To Defund Planned Parenthood. In December 2015, Heller effectively voted for defunding Planned Parenthood. According to Congressional Quarterly, the amendment would have “remove[d] the section of the measure that would block for one year federal funding that is considered direct spending to Planned Parenthood.” The underlying legislation was a substitute amendment repealing key provisions of the Affordable Care Act while also defunding Planned Parenthood. The vote was on a motion to waive all applicable budgetary discipline required a 3/5’s majority. The Senate rejected the amendment by a vote of 48 to 52. [Senate Vote 314,12/3/15; Congressional Quarterly, 12/3/15; Congressional Quarterly, 12/3/15; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 2885; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 2874; Congressional Actions, H.R. 3762]

2015: Heller Voted To Defund Planned Parenthood. In September 2015, Heller effectively voted for a 10-week continuing resolution that defunded Planned Parenthood. According to Congressional Quarterly, the vote was on a  “Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Cochran, R-Miss., substitute amendment no. 2669 that would provide continuing appropriations for government operations through Dec. 11, 2015, at an annual rate of about $1.017 trillion. It also would prohibit for one year federal funding for Planned Parenthood or its affiliates unless they certify that they will not perform, or fund other entities that perform, abortions during that period. The substitute amendment would redirect $235 million to community health centers.” The vote was on a motion to concur. The Senate rejected the motion by a vote of 47 to 52. [Senate Vote 270, 9/30/15; Congressional Quarterly, 9/24/15; Congressional Actions,H.R. 719; Congressional Actions, S. Amdt. 2669; Congressional Actions, H.J. Res. 61]

2015: Heller Voted To Defund Planned Parenthood. In May 2015, Heller voted for barring all federal funding to Planned Parenthood. According to CNN, “The fight over funding for Planned Parenthood shifts to a must-pass government funding measure this fall after a procedural vote in the Senate on legislation that would have barred all federal funds for the group failed on Monday.”  The vote was on cloture the Motion to Proceed; the motion was rejected by a vote of 53 to 46; 60 Senators voting yes would have been required to proceed. [Senate Vote 262, 8/3/15; CNN, 8/4/15; Congressional Actions, S. 1881]

2011: Heller Voted To Defund Planned Parenthood. In April 2011, Heller voted for a resolution that, according to Congressional Quarterly, would have “bar[red] the use of funds made available in the bill to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America Inc. or its affiliates.” The vote was on a concurrent resolution to order the House clerk to make a correction in the enrollment of the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2011 by inserting the proposed amendment. The House adopted the resolution by a vote of 241 to 185, and it was then sent to the Senate, which rejected it. [House Vote 271, 4/14/11; Congressional Quarterly, 4/14/11; Congressional Actions, H. Con. Res. 36]

2011: Heller Voted To Eliminate Funding For Planned Parenthood In The 2011 Continuing Appropriations Bill. In February 2011, Heller voted for a bill that would have, cut federal funding for Planned Parenthood. According to Roll Call, “More than a dozen House Republicans confirmed Wednesday that their vote on any long-term continuing resolution could well hinge on whether it includes language to cut off federal funding for Planned Parenthood, which offers abortion services. […] Michael Steel, spokesman for Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), declined Wednesday to discuss how leadership is planning to deal with conservative concerns over abortion funding. ‘At this point, our position is [to support] H.R. 1, which includes those provisions,’ Steel said in a statement. ‘We’re still waiting to see a plan to cut spending and help create jobs from the Democrats who run Washington.’” The House passed the bill by a vote of 235 to 189. The Senate extensively amended the legislation and passed the bill, but it was not taken up again by the House. [House Vote 147, 2/19/11; Roll Call, 3/10/11; Congressional Actions, H.R. 1]

2011: Heller Voted To Defund Planned Parenthood. In February 2011, Heller voted for an amendment that, according to Congressional Quarterly, would have “prohibit[ed] any funds in the bill from being made available to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America Inc. or its affiliates.” The underlying bill combined the Defense Appropriations Act and the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2011. The amendment was approved by the House by a vote of 240 to 185. The House approved the underlying bill and sent it to the Senate, which substituted different legislation into the bill. [House Vote 93, 2/18/11; Congressional Quarterly,2/18/11; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 95; Congressional Actions, H.R. 1]

2009: Heller Voted To Bar Planned Parenthood From Receiving Federal Funding For Voluntary Family Planning And Related Health Services. In July 2009, Heller voted for an amendment that, according to Congressional Quarterly, “would [have] bar[red] funds [in the underlying bill] from being available for Planned Parenthood for voluntary family planning.” The vote was on a proposed amendment to the proposed Labor, Health and Human Services and Education Department appropriations bill for fiscal year 2010. The House rejected the amendment by a vote of 183 to 247. [House Vote 643, 7/24/09; Congressional Quarterly, 7/24/09; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 389; Congressional Actions, H.R. 3293]

2007: Heller Voted To Bar Funds In An FY 2008 Labor, HHS And Education Appropriations Bill From Being Used To Fund Planned Parenthood. In July 2007, Heller voted for an amendment that would have, according to Congressional Quarterly, “bar[red] the use of funds in the bill for Planned Parenthood.” The underlying legislation was an FY 2008 Labor, HHS and Education appropriations bill. The vote was on the amendment. The House rejected the amendment by a vote of 189 to 231. [House Vote 684, 7/19/07; Congressional Quarterly, 7/19/07; Congressional Actions, H. Amdt. 594; Congressional Actions, H.R. 3043]

 

Planned Parenthood Provided Health Care To 16,007 Patients And Cancer Screenings To 2,497 Patients In Nevada

Planned Parenthood Served 16,007 Patients In Nevada. [Planned Parenthood website, Accessed 6/22/17]

Planned Parenthood Provided Cancer Screenings To 2,497 Patients In Nevada. [Planned Parenthood website, Accessed 4/19/17]