Questions For Sean Spicer’s “First Official” White House Press Briefing

There will be fireworks. Will there be answers?

Apparently, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer is giving himself a do-over after his disastrous Saturday White House press briefing by declaring this afternoon’s press conference the “first official” one. Spicer’s performance on Saturday was the briefing that launched a thousand memes and his flat-out lies about President Trump’s inauguration crowd size spurred #SpicerFacts and #AlternativeFacts.

As the press corps prepares for round two with a White House Press Secretary and an administration that has demonstrated it will lie about even the most trivial facts, American Bridge Vice President Shripal Shah is calling for attention to breaking news counterintelligence officials have investigated Donald Trump’s National Security Advisor Michael Flynn’s communications with Russia.

“Sean Spicer’s credibility with the press is already circling the drain,” said American Bridge Vice President Shripal Shah. “At today’s briefing, he must answer serious questions about Donald Trump’s ties to Putin and the Kremlin, the investigation into National Security Advisor Michael Flynn’s ties to Russia, and other critical concerns about Russia hacking our democracy.”

Here are just a few:

  1. First and foremost, does Sean Spicer stand by his statement that the conversation between Michael Flynn and Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak on the day the Obama administration announced new sanctions against Russia was about setting up a meeting between Trump and Vladimir Putin?
  2. Will Michael Flynn recuse himself from the ongoing joint investigation by the FBI, CIA, National Security Agency, the Justice Department, and the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network into whether money from the Kremlin went toward aiding Trump’s campaign?
  3. Is Michael Flynn one of the four Trump associates the FBI applied for a FISA warrant to monitor over the summer due to suspected inappropriate contacts with Russian officials?
  4. Taking into account the FBI and other intelligence agencies’ months-long investigation into whether the Kremlin secretly aided Donald Trump, will President Trump commit to signing bipartisan legislation from Senators Graham, McCain, and Cardin to increase sanctions on Russia over its interference in the presidential election?
  5. Does the cloud of investigation hanging over his administration influence whether Trump will attempt to veto the bipartisan bill stripping him of his ability to lift Russian sanctions without congressional approval?
  6. Will the Trump Administration commit now to releasing a declassified report with findings upon the conclusion of these investigations?